In 2015 a group of committed friends got together and formed Women’s Emergence with the intention of supporting conscious living, compassionate action and mindful education. In 2016 Women’s Emergence created The Mindfulness Green Cooperative as the vehicle to make that mission possible.


The website MindfulnessGreen.com is intended to be a playful expression that is an inclusive, creative and fun way to promote compassionate action in the world. We serve to protect our planet, people and animals, create optimally healthy minds and bodies and live mindful and connected lives.


We are a cooperative and always welcome your input, contributions to our content and suggestions. We are grateful you are here and honored that you have visited our website.  

Momentum and Flow

Momentum and Flow

One of the main purposes of life is expansion; expansion of consciousness, happiness, abundance and well-being. For this to take place two things must be present; change and momentum. The old state must give way to a new expanded state or experience or situation and there must be flow and momentum to carry life forward.

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What You Can Do: At Home

Making a few small changes in your home and yard can reduce greenhouse gases and save you money. Explore our list of 10 simple steps you can take to reduce greenhouse gas emissions:

1. Change five lights

Replace your five most frequently used light fixtures or the lightbulbs in them with ENERGY STAR–qualified products and you will help the environment while saving $70 a year on energy bills. ENERGY STAR lighting provides bright, warm light; generates 75% less heat; uses about 75% less energy than standard lighting; and lasts from 10 to 50 times longer.

2. Look for ENERGY STAR

When buying new products for your home, look for EPA's ENERGY STAR label to help you make the most energy-efficient decision. You can find the ENERGY STAR label on more than 60 kinds of products, including appliances, lighting, heating and cooling equipment, electronics, and office equipment. Over their lifetimes, products in your home that have earned the ENERGY STAR label can reduce greenhouse gas emissions by about 130,000 pounds and save you $11,000 on energy bills.

3. Heat and cool smartly

Heating and cooling accounts for almost half your energy bill—about $1,000 a year! There is a lot you can do to drive down this cost. Simple steps like changing air filters regularly, properly using a programmable thermostat, and having your heating and cooling equipment maintained annually by a licensed contractor can save energy and increase comfort while helping to protect the environment. Depending on where you live, you can cut your annual energy bill by more than $200 by replacing your old heating and cooling equipment with ENERGY STAR–qualified equipment.

4. Seal and insulate your home

Reduce air leaks and stop drafts by using caulk, weather stripping, and insulation to seal your home's envelope and add more insulation to your attic to block out heat and cold. A knowledgeable homeowner or skilled contractor can save up to 20% on heating and cooling costs and significantly enhance home comfort with comprehensive sealing and insulating measures.

5. Reduce, reuse, recycle

Reducing, reusing, and recycling in your home helps conserve energy and reduces pollution and greenhouse gas emissions from resource extraction, manufacturing, and disposal. If there is a recycling program in your community, recycle your newspapers, beverage containers, paper, and other goods. Also, composting your food and yard waste reduces the amount of garbage that you send to landfills and reduces greenhouse gas emissions. Visit EPA's Individual Waste Reduction Model (iWARM) to learn about the energy benefits of recycling, rather than landfilling, common waste products.

6. Use water efficiently

It takes lots of energy to pump, treat, and heat water, so saving water reduces greenhouse gas emissions. Saving water around the home is simple. Three percent of the nation's energy is used to pump and treat water, so conserving water conserves energy that reduces greenhouse gas pollution. Reduce the amount of waste you generate and the water you consume whenever possible. Pursue simple water-saving actions, such as not letting the water run while shaving or brushing teeth, and save money while conserving water by using products with the WaterSense label. Did you know a leaky toilet can waste 200 gallons of water per day? Repair all toilet and faucet leaks right away. Running your dishwasher only with a full load can save 100 pounds of carbon dioxide and $40 per year. Be smart when irrigating your lawn or landscape. Only water when needed, and do it during the coolest part of the day; early morning is best. See EPA WaterSense for more water saving tips.

7. Be green in your yard

Did you know that food scraps and yard waste make up 20-30 percent of what we throw away? Composting your food and yard waste reduces the amount of garbage that you send to landfills and reduces greenhouse gas emissions. See EPA’s tips on how to compost.

8. Purchase green power

Power your home by purchasing green power. Green power is environmentally friendly electricity that is generated from renewable energy sources such as wind and the sun. There are two ways to use green power: You can buy green power, or you can modify your house to generate your own green power. Buying green power is easy. It offers a number of environmental and economic benefits over conventional electricity, including lower greenhouse gas emissions, and it helps increase clean energy supply. There are a number of steps you can take to create a greener home EXIT, including installing solar panels and researching incentives for renewable energy EXIT in your state.

9. Calculate your household's carbon footprint

Use EPA's Household Carbon Footprint Calculator to estimate your household greenhouse gas emissions resulting from energy use, transportation, and waste disposal. This tool helps you understand where your emissions come from and identify ways to reduce them.

10. Spread the word

Tell family and friends that energy efficiency is good for their homes and good for the environment because it lowers greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution. Tell five people and together we can help our homes help us all.

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What You Can Do about Climate Change

This site provides more than 25 easy steps you can take at Home, School, the Office, and On the Road to protect the climate, reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) pollution, and save money. Take action today! Small steps add up, if we all do our part.

Small changes at home and in the yard can reduce GHG emissions and save money.

Easy steps at the office can reduce GHG emissions and help make the air cleaner.

Take action on the road to reduce car pollution, gas costs, and the nation's oil dependence.

Taking educational and action planning steps at school can help reduce GHG emissions.

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What EPA Is Doing about Climate Change

EPA is taking a number of common-sense steps to address the challenge of climate change.

Collecting Emissions Data

EPA collects various types of greenhouse gas emissions data. This data helps policy makers, businesses, and the Agency track greenhouse gas emissions trends and identify opportunities for reducing emissions and increasing efficiency.

Getting Reductions

EPA is reducing greenhouse gas emissions and promoting a clean energy economy through highly successful partnerships and common-sense regulatory initiatives.

  • Developing Common-sense Regulatory Initiatives: EPA is developing common-sense regulatory initiatives, to reduce GHG emissions and increase efficiency. For example, EPA's vehicle greenhouse gas rules will save consumers $1.7 trillion at the pump by 2025, and eliminate six billion metric tons of GHG pollution.
  • Partnering With the Private Sector: Through voluntary energy and climate programs, EPA's partners reduced over 345 million metric tons of greenhouse gases in 2010 alone - equivalent to the emissions from 81 million vehicles - and saving consumers and businesses of about $21 billion.
  • Reducing EPA's Carbon Footprint: EPA is monitoring emissions from its own energy use and fuel consumption and working to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 25% by 2020. Learn more about how we're greening EPA.

Evaluating Policy Options, Costs and Benefits

EPA conducts economy-wide analyses to understand the economic impacts and effectiveness of proposed climate policies. Learn more about EPA's economic analyses on climate policies and the associated costs and benefits.

Advancing the Science

EPA contributes to world-class climate research through the U.S. Global Change Research Program and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change EXIT. EPA's Office of Research and Development conducts research to understand the environmental and health impacts of climate change and to provide sustainable solutions for adapting to and reducing the impact from a changing climate.

Partnering Internationally

EPA is engaged in a variety of international activities to advance climate change science, monitor our environment, and promote activities that reduce greenhouse gas emissions. EPA establishes partnerships, provides leadership, and shares technical expertise to support these activities. Learn more about EPA's International Climate Partnerships.

Partnering With States, Localities, and Tribes

EPA's State and Local Climate and Energy Program provides technical assistance, analytical tools, and outreach support on climate change issues to state, local, and tribal governments. See the progress made by our pilot communities.

Helping Communities Adapt

EPA's Climate Ready Estuaries and Climate Ready Water Utilities programs help coastal resource managers and water utility managers, respectively, plan and prepare for climate change. Learn more about EPA's efforts on adapting to climate change.

 

 

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Adapting to Climate Change

"Adaptation" refers to the adjustments that societies or ecosystems make to limit the negative effects of climate change or to take advantage of opportunities provided by a changing climate. Adaptation can range from a farmer planting more drought-resistant crops to a coastal community evaluating how best to protect its infrastructure from rising sea level.

Climate change is already impacting societies and ecosystems around the world, and many impacts are expected to increase as global temperatures continue to rise. While reducing greenhouse gas emissions is required to avoid the worst impacts of climate change, a certain amount of global warming is inevitable, due to the long-lasting nature of greenhouse gases already in the atmosphere, and to heat already stored in the oceans. Adapting to the changes that are already underway, and preparing for future climate change, can help reduce the risks societies will face from climate change.

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Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions

We are already experiencing the effects of climate change. Temperatures are rising, snow and rainfall patterns are shifting, and more extreme climate events—like heavy rainstorms and record high temperatures—are already taking place. These changes are linked to the climbing levels of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in our atmosphere, caused by human activities such as burning fossil fuels for energy.

By taking action to reduce emissions of the greenhouse gas pollution that warms our planet, we can reduce the risks we will face from future climate change. EPA, businesses, and individuals all have an important role to play.

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From Fear to Freedom

From Fear to Freedom

There is a lot of talk now-a-days about power and how certain ideas and people have been able to rise to power all over the world. There is a certain strain that runs through situations where discrimination, separation, ideas of better than, rejection of what is different, and an increased level of attack and reaction dominate. That strain is fear and lack.


Fear and lack cause separation. Fear is a wall of energy that we create when we fear someone or something and we do this as a protective mechanism. It is a primitive reaction to survive or preserve well-being. When we feel lack, we feel that there isn’t enough to go around and we become protective of our life, our ways and our things. This accentuates our fears.

The separation that arises from fear and lack is the essential limitation to our state of consciousness and the outward expansion of our life. And it works in a vicious cycle; separation causes fear and fear causes separation.

When we are in fear and lack we lash out, we build walls, be reject people who are different and we live in reactive mode, sometimes war-like mode. Some see these reactive tendencies as power, but it is reactive fear.

What are the effects of connection? Enthusiasm, compassion, kindness, openness and peace. This is the opposite of separation and fear. In fear and separation we live in reaction, and not response. We become thin-skinned and lose our ‘allowing and accepting’ nature. We grasp for things to be our way only and push away all people, places and things that disagree or are different.

Being mindful of how we are thinking is critical to our peace of mind. Accepting and resolving our fears are necessary for our expansion and joy. If we want fulfillment and peace, then we need to look deeply at how we see the world and what we hold within us.

And this goes for both “sides”. If one is liberal or one is conservative, if one is black or one is white, if one is educated or one is uneducated, if one is wealthy or one is poor, if one is democratic or one is authoritarian, if one is gay or one is straight……. Do you see the ‘other’ as wrong or less than or want them kept out? Do you see yourself as better, right or deserving of more because you are right and better?

This isn’t really about rightness or being better. This is about fulfillment and peace, allowing and acceptance, and ultimately your happiness.

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The VERY BEST Chocolate Chip Cookie

The VERY BEST Chocolate Chip Cookie

I am a chocolate chip cookie addict. To me they are woman’s best invention. I am eternally grateful to Ruth Graves Wakefield for her gift to us all.

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Smart Shopping to Trim Time in the Kitchen

Smart Shopping to Trim Time in the Kitchen

Make the most of your time when you go to the supermarket with a plan.

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Books for cultivating Mindfulness

Books for cultivating Mindfulness

For the best information about Mindfulness practices, stories, recommended approaches and real-life support the list of books below can serve as a great foundation for your mindfulness practices.

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Oral Health Choices

Oral Health Choices

An electric toothbrush or manual soft bristled toothbrush?

The American Dental Association says that an electric toothbrush does a better job removing plaque and preventing gingivitis.

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And the Happiest Countries on Earth are…..

And the Happiest Countries on Earth are…..

The United Nations has issued the happiest country in the world list for 2016.

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Un-loveability And Overcoming Depression

Un-loveability And Overcoming Depression

Most of us go through life with bouts of sadness or depression, but it doesn’t dominate.

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Weighing the Claims of Diet Ads

Weighing the Claims of Diet Ads

Will I Really Lose Weight?

Wouldn’t it be nice if you could lose weight simply by taking a pill, wearing a patch, or rubbing in a cream? Unfortunately, claims that you can lose weight without changing your habits just aren’t true.

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Choosing a Safe and Successful Weight-loss Program

Choosing a Safe and Successful Weight-loss Program

Introduction

Do you need to lose weight? Have you been thinking about trying a weight-loss program?

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Eating disorders

Eating disorders

People with eating disorders become so focused on eating or not eating that they really hurt their bodies. People with eating disorders also may spend a lot of time thinking about their weight or how their body looks.

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Having body image issues

Having body image issues

Do you wish you could lose weight, get taller, or develop faster? It's pretty common to worry a little about how your body looks, especially when it's changing. You can learn about body image and ways to take control of yours.

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Can Eating Meat Cause Cancer? Yes It Can

Can Eating Meat Cause Cancer? Yes It Can

Red meat (beef, pork, veal, lamb, mutton, goat meat or horse meat) and processed meats (meat that has been salted, cured, fermented, smoked or processed) were evaluated at the International Agency for Research on Cancer in France by 22 scientists.Here are their conclusions:


Meat processing such as curing and smoking forms carcinogenic chemicals.

Meat processing, such as curing and smoking, can result in formation of carcinogenic chemicals, including N-nitroso-compounds (NOC) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Cooking improves the digestibility and palatability of meat, but can also produce known or suspected carcinogens, including heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAA) and PAH. High-temperature cooking by pan-frying, grilling, or barbecuing generally produces the highest amounts of these chemicals.”

This group of scientists examined over 800 epidemiological studies that dealt with meat consumption and cancer. In half of the studies dealing with colorectal cancer there was a positive link between eating meat and colorectal cancer, and there was a 66% association between eating processed meat and colorectal cancer.

In addition the study concluded:

Positive associations were seen in cohort studies and population-based case-control studies between consumption of red meat and cancers of the pancreas and the prostate (mainly advanced prostate cancer), and between consumption of processed meat and cancer of the stomach.’

In their conclusion statements the scientists stated:

Overall, the Working Group classified consumption of processed meat as “carcinogenic to humans” (Group 1) on the basis of sufficient evidence for colorectal cancer. Additionally, a positive association with the consumption of processed meat was found for stomach cancer.

The Working Group classified consumption of red meat as “probably carcinogenic to humans” (Group 2A). In making this evaluation, the Working Group took into consideration all the relevant data, including the substantial epidemiological data showing a positive association between consumption of red meat and colorectal cancer and the strong mechanistic evidence. Consumption of red meat was also positively associated with pancreatic and with prostate cancer.’

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Climate Change Indicators: Coastal Flooding

Climate Change Indicators: Coastal Flooding

This indicator shows how the frequency of coastal flooding has changed over time. 

  • Map with bar graphs showing changes in the frequency of flooding along the U.S. coastline between the 1950s and 2010s.
    Download Data  Download Image  KMZ Icon
     
     

    This map shows the average number of days per year in which coastal waters rose above the local threshold for minor flooding at 27 sites along U.S. coasts. Each small bar graph compares the first decade of widespread measurements (the 1950s in orange) with the most recent decade (the 2010s in purple).

    Data source: NOAA, 20163
    Web update: August 2016

  • Bar graph showing the average number of coastal flood events per year during 20-year periods from 1950 to 2015.
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Key Points

  • Flooding is becoming more frequent along the U.S. coastline. Nearly every site measured has experienced an increase in coastal flooding since the 1950s (see Figure 1). The rate is accelerating in many locations along the East and Gulf Coasts (see Figure 2).
  • The Mid-Atlantic region suffers the highest number of coastal flood days and has also experienced the largest increases in flooding. Since 2010, Wilmington, North Carolina, has flooded most often—49 days per year—followed by Annapolis, Maryland, at 46 days per year. Annapolis, Wilmington, and two locations in New Jersey (Sandy Hook and Atlantic City) have also seen some of the most dramatic overall increases in frequency: floods are now at least 10 times more common there than they were in the 1950s. The Mid-Atlantic’s subsiding land and higher-than-average relative sea level rise both contribute to this increase in flooding (see the Sea Level indicator).
  • Flooding has increased less dramatically in places where the local flood threshold is higher (for example, the Northeast and locations on the Gulf of Mexico) or where relative sea level has not risen as quickly as it has elsewhere in the United States (for example, Hawaii and the West Coast, as shown by the Sea Level indicator).

References

1. Melillo, J.M., T.C. Richmond, and G.W. Yohe (eds.). 2014. Climate change impacts in the United States: The third National Climate Assessment. U.S. Global Change Research Program. http://nca2014.globalchange.gov.

2. Trtanj, J., L. Jantarasami, J. Brunkard, T. Collier, J. Jacobs, E. Lipp, S. McLellan, S. Moore, H. Paerl, J. Ravenscroft, M. Sengco, and J. Thurston. 2016. Chapter 6: Climate impacts on water-related illness. The impacts of climate change on human health in the United States: A scientific assessment. U.S. Global Change Research Program. https://health2016.globalchange.gov.

3. NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration). 2016 update to data originally published in: NOAA. 2014. Sea level rise and nuisance flood frequency changes around the United States. NOAA Technical Report NOS CO-OPS 073.https://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/publications/NOAA_Technical_Report_NOS_COOPS_073.pdf.

4. NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration). 2016 update to data originally published in: NOAA. 2014. Sea level rise and nuisance flood frequency changes around the United States. NOAA Technical Report NOS CO-OPS 073.https://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/publications/NOAA_Technical_Report_NOS_COOPS_073.pdf.

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A Closer Look: Land Loss Along the Atlantic Coast

A Closer Look: Land Loss Along the Atlantic Coast

This feature provides a closer look at one consequence of sea level rise along the Atlantic coast: the conversion of land to open water.

  • Bar graph showing the net amount of land converted to open water along the Atlantic coast during three time periods: 1996–2001, 1996–2006, and 1996–2011. Results are divided by region.
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    Reference map that shows how the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast regions are defined for Figure 1.This graph shows the net amount of land converted to open water along the Atlantic coast during three time periods: 1996–2001, 1996–2006, and 1996–2011. The results are divided into two regions: the Southeast and the Mid-Atlantic (see locator map). Negative numbers show where land loss is outpaced by the accumulation of new land.

    Data source: NOAA, 20132
    Web update: May 2014

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